Slayer

Slayer

Primus, Ministry, Phil Anselmo

Fri, November 22, 2019

6:00 pm

First Interstate MetraPark

Billings, MT

Slayer
Slayer
"We definitely made our own road
and there's not too many people driving
down our road. Nobody's doing it."

Coming from anyone else, this might sound like an idle boast. When guitarist Kerry King of Slayer says it; it's a simple statement of fact. Almost 20 years after Slayer first started blending the heavy riffs of metal with the anger and violence of punk, the next chapter in the Slayer story will be written with the release of GOD HATES US ALL. It's been three years since Slayer last released a record, 1998's DIABOLUS IN MUSICA, but it's not like the guys have been lounging around poolside, sipping mai-tais and waiting for the royalty checks to roll in. "We started working on this record after we got done with a long touring cycle, but prior to Ozzfest '99," says guitarist Jeff Hanneman. "And like every three or four months, something would come up to sidetrack us so we couldn't finish it. We'd have to take a break and learn stuff for Ozzfest and come back, work for a few months, go in and do a WCW song for a month ('Here Comes The Pain'), go out on the Tattoo the Earth tour, last summer. Then we'd work for a few more months until we were asked to do a song -- "Bloodline" for the 'Dracula 2000' soundtrack, and that was the last break. Then we got our shit together, went up to Vancouver and made a record."

Recorded at The Warehouse, a Vancouver studio owned by Bryan Adams, certain alterations had to be made in converting Slayer's new environs from a studio owned by a lightweight Canadian pop singer to something suitable for four men recording a 12-14-song album titled GOD HATES US ALL. Slight alterations, like a chalked-out crime-scene-style drawing of a body on the floor. Candles. Dimmed lights. Incense. Porn-covered walls. All the little amenities that make a house a home.

"We had two banner flags that were of middle fingers," says singer/bassist Tom Araya. "As you walked into the first door of the studio, there was a Misfits' skull that said, Eat a bag. The next door you opened, there was a white flag with a middle finger pointed up right in your face. You'd open the door to the mixing room, there's another middle finger. That was basically the attitude of Slayer in the studio. We had a red devil head on one of the speakers. We had a skull on another. That_s the kind of shit we put up. Spooky stuff that makes you feel at home."

Slayer picked Matt Hyde to produce GOD HATES US ALL, after his stellar work on "Bloodline" for the 'Dracula 2000' soundtrack. "He had a handle on every aspect of the recording. He likes the band, he likes the music," says King. "He knew what we were trying to achieve, rather than just us telling him. He knew what was going on. I tell people he's God, might as well bring in the cross and nail him up to it because he's the fucking best."

As intense a record as Slayer has recorded, God Hates Us All found King and Hanneman stripping the songwriting down to the essentials, trimming the fat and keeping the fury. "I didn't write the usual Dungeons and Dragons shit, looking in the synonym finder for words I have no idea what they mean anyway, " King says by way of explanation. "This is a lot more how I talk, a lot more street. A lot of the topics are things people can relate to and they_ll hear the street-style version, so I think they_ll get more out of it."

You'd have to be deaf, dumb or dead to miss the message of songs like "Threshold" or "Exile", which crackle with the unchecked wrath Slayer, fans have come to count on. "Threshold" is about reaching your limit in any given aspect, with a person in a situation where you're about to break. You're about to blow-up," says King. 'Exile' is pretty much about a person--everybody's got one--who is like the anti-them -- you just hate with every ounce of your fucking being. It_s called "Exile" because you want them away from you. You want to kill yourself so you don't have to deal with them anymore."

King and Hanneman toyed with new guitar tunings on the album, taking the plunge down to Drop B a couple times and hauling out a seven-string axe for the first time in Slayer history. "A lot of people you see in Guitar World say, "I'm not Steve Vai, I have no reason to play a seven-string," says King. "That's like telling a drummer to play a single kick drum, trying to tell him he doesn't need a double-bass kick. It doesn't make sense. Or they cop out saying, 'I'm not that good.' You don't have to be good to make up a seven-string riff."

Slayer records begin with the drums, and Paul Bostaph, timekeeper for half of Slayer's nearly 20 years as a band, says there's a simple rule he follows in setting the brutal pace. "Rick Rubin once said the perfect take is the one that felt like it was going to fall apart but never did. I thought that was one of the wisest things I've ever heard and I always try to go for that."

During breaks from recording, Slayer hits the town, patronizing local bars like the Shark Club and the Cobalt Club and watching nearly every hockey game the hometown Vancouver Canucks played. Singer Tom Araya spent his off-hours reading true crime novels with cheery titles along the lines of "Happy Like Murderers'" to help him inhabit the minds of murderous priests ("God Send Death") and a fallen angel pushing drugs ("Cast Down"). "I use those books to spark my imagination, to go into the role playing that I need in order to sound convincing. I need to sing and make it sound like I'm actually going to do these things I'm saying. They help out a lot with the screaming."

Let other bands break-up, try to "find their sound" or record albums with symphonies. In the fickle, ever-changing world of music, Slayer remains a sure thing. "I think I'm a fan first and foremost," says King. "The difference between me and the people watching our show is that I learned how to play guitar. For some reason, I know how to make up riffs for Slayer and I get the opportunity to do that, so I'm like the superfan. It's what I'm into. If I was going to start a new band today, I'd want it to be just like this one."
Primus
Primus
Bass-oriented alternative metal band, formed in California in the mid 1980s, under the original name 'Primate'.

In 1989 Primus released their debut album "Suck On This", followed by a line of successful albums in the early 1990s; "Frizzle Fry" (1990), "Sailing The Seas Of Cheese" (1991) and "Pork Soda" (1993), plus their first 'covers' EP "Miscellaneous Debris" (1992). Their fifth album, "Tales From The Punch Bowl", went Gold before the end of 1995. During the summer of 1996 they parted ways with drummer, Tim Alexander, who was replaced by Bryan "Brain" Mantia - making his debut on "The Brown Album" (1997). A second 'covers' EP "Rhinoplasty" followed in 1998.

Primus then departed from their previous approach, with the "Antipop" album in 1999. A more metallic sound, featuring different producers on almost every track - including such notables as Rage Against The Machine's Tom Morello; Limp BizKit's Fred Durst; Tom Waits; South Park creator, Matt Stone and former Police drummer Stewart Copeland. It also included such guest artists as Metallica's James Hetfield and former Faith No More guitarist, Jim Martin.

Mantia left in 2000 to join Guns N' Roses. During the ensuing break, band leader/bassist Claypool focused on recording his side project, Oyster Head (which included Copeland and Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio), as well as releasing a two-part solo, "Live Frogs: Set 1 and Set 2". Re-united with Tim "Herb" Alexander in 2003, Claypool and LaLonde released the EP "Animals Should Not Try To Act Like People" and a DVD compilation, featuring the band's videos, studio footage and rare performance bootlegs.

2006 saw the band release another DVD; "Blame It On The Fish" featuring the band live on their 2003 tour, as well as a greatest hits package "They Can't All Be Zingers: The Best Of Primus". This was followed by the "Beat A Dead Horse Tour" in 2006 and a further album
Ministry
Ministry
Ministry is the brainchild of Al Jourgensen. Beginning in 1981 playing synth pop with a strong disco influence, they released their first 12" on Wax Trax! Records, before being signed to Arista and releasing their debut "With Sympathy" in 1983. After a falling out with the label and the direction of the project, Jourgensen returned to Wax Trax! Records to release a series of 12" Singles, including "All Day / Everyday (Is Halloween)" which became an instant club favorite and would go on to become one of the band's most popular songs.

Jourgensen then signed to Sire/Warner Bros. Records in 1985. Ministry's second album "Twitch" was produced by Adrian Sherwood and had a more menacing sound reflecting Jourgensen's interest in the international EBM (electronic body music) scene of the time. Ministry's third album, "The Land Of Rape And Honey" (1988,) was both a natural evolution of their aesthetic and a sharp break with previous pop tendencies and, with the arrival of Paul Barker and other new members, Ministry's sound developed into a crossover between EBM, industrial, and heavy metal. Their experimentation with heavy metal was then continued with the following "The Mind Is A Terrible Thing To Taste" (1990), where the guitar began to take on much more importance to their sound. Ministry's breakthrough album, "ΚΕΦΑΛΗΞΘ" (1992), was a very dark, powerful, and violent album, that saw the band moving further into thrash metal while still retaining elements of industrial music and noise. The following records "Filth Pig" (1996) and "Dark Side Of The Spoon" (1999) showcased a much more straightforward heavy metal sound, to lower sales than previous records. The band released their first best of collection entitled "Greatest Fits" (2001) and were then dropped by Warner Bros. Records.

In 2003, the band then moved to Sanctuary Records and released "Animositisomina". Paul Barker left the band in January 2004, leaving Jourgensen to put together a new line-up for "Houses Of The Molé". After the 2004 Evil Doer Tour, there was yet another change in personnel with Prong founder Tommy Victor on guitar and Paul Raven (who had also played in Prong and in Killing Joke) on bass. In may, 2006, Ministry released "Rio Grande Blood" which was quickly followed by what was announced as their final album, "The Last Sucker", in 2007, and a collection of covers entitled "Cover Up" in 2008.

Despite Jourgensen's claim that the band was over, 2010 saw another collection, mixing covers and remixes, entitled "Undercover". Following a serious illness, Al Jourgensen decided to restart the band with Mike Scaccia and two new Ministry albums followed, "Relapse" in 2012 and "From Beer To Eternity" 2013. Scaccia's death in 2012 had apparently brought a final, definite end to the band with the 2013 album until early 2017 when Jourgensen began working on a new album, tentatively titled "AmeriKKKant."
Phil Anselmo
Phil Anselmo
Born: June 30, 1968, New Orleans, Louisiana
Venue Information:
First Interstate MetraPark
308 6th Ave N
Billings, MT, 59101
http://www.metrapark.com/