Korn

Live Nation Presents

Korn

Stone Sour, Baby Metal, Yelawolf, Islander

Sun, June 25, 2017

Doors: 4:00 pm / Show: 5:00 pm

Ford Idaho Center - Amphitheater

Nampa, ID

$29.50-$49.50

This event is all ages

Korn
Korn
Korn embrace the future on The Path of Totality, their tenth full-length studio album and second for Roadrunner Records. Infusing dubstep anarchy into their signature sound, the legendary quartet stand on the cusp of a musical revolution for both hard rock and electronica.

Korn are no strangers to revolution though. In fact, they've been purveyors of heavy music's progression since forming in Bakersfield, CA in 1994 and becoming one of the most influential entities that the genre has ever seen. Their legendary self-titled debut took the world by storm with its schizophrenic metallic catharsis. No one had ever played heavy music with such personal lyrics and funked-out grooves. Immediately, they earned a place in the hearts of fans across the globe. However, their third offering, 1998's Follow the Leader, bridged the gap between hip hop and heavy metal more seamlessly than any album before or after, and it solidified them as inspirational innovators.

Numerous acts "followed the leader", and heavy metal underwent a renaissance in the early 2000s with Korn at the forefront. Slipknot, Staind, Disturbed, and countless others nodded to the group as an inspiration. In addition, they've garnered two Grammy Awards— one for Best Short Form Video for "Freak on a Leash" from Follow the Leader and one for Best Metal Performance for "Here to Stay" from 2002's Untouchables—and sold 35 million albums worldwide. However, they're ushering in a new horizon for heavy music with The Path of Totality.

Collaborating with dubstep heavyweights Skrillex, Excision, Downlink, Noisia, Feed Me, 12th Planet, and Flinch, Korn have constructed a hypnotic hybrid of dubstep and metal. Bouncing from polyrhythmic guitar pummeling into drastic electro drops, the music is dark, dangerous, and definitive Korn. "It's future metal," declares vocalist Jonathan Davis. "We're mixing metal and electro music, and you're not supposed to do that.

Since day one, Korn has always been all about going against the grain, experimenting, and trying to take music different places." Shaffer affirms, "You need to be pushed out of your comfort zone to take chances. We were able to do that by collaborating with all of these brilliant writers and challenging ourselves. We're still pushing ourselves to grow." In 2009, Davis began to envision the place where Korn would venture next. A lifelong electronic music fan and DJ, he'd cruise Beatport and fervently download the latest tracks from various underground dubstep artists. Last year, his obsession intensified.


Korn released "Get Up!" in May 2011 and it caught fire online, selling over 200k digital downloads. "You can't help but get excited when you hear that song," smiles Fieldy. "That's how we knew we were on to something." There was no question. Korn knew they needed to do an entire album following this muse. The band would record with dubstep DJs back in Davis's home studio in Bakersfield during inspired sessions. Vocals were actually tracked in the singer's home theater or in closets and hotels everywhere from Korea to Japan.
Stone Sour
Stone Sour don't play it safe on their fourth offering, House of Gold & Bones — Parts 1 & 2.

House of Gold & Bones Parts 1 & 2 is a collection of 23 tracks that follow an immersive, linear storyline. The songs set the tone and follow the action, but House of Gold & Bones is a multimedia experience. Videos, an online presence, album packaging, the live show and even a graphic novel will all follow and expand on the story. It's a lofty undertaking, but Stone Sour have never shied away from a challenge. With them, it's par for the course.

The gold-selling Iowa hard rock outfit has sold over four million albums worldwide over the course of three full-length releases. Their self-titled debut and sophomore effort Come What(ever) May both exceeded Gold status, while 2010's Audio Secrecy debuted at #6 on the Billboard Top 200. Their arsenal includes number one singles such as "Through Glass," "Say You'll Haunt Me" and "Bother," and three Grammy Award nominations. Given those accomplishments, it'd be easy for the band—Corey Taylor [Vocals], James Root [Guitar], Josh Rand [Guitar], and Roy Mayorga [Drums]—to tread the same ground with very successful results. But they completely flip the globe on its axis this time around.

"To us, this was bigger than just a collection of songs," says Rand. "We wanted to do something really special, and it started when Corey told us about the concept. There was a big mission, and everything tied in from the story to the music. We all put a lot into this, and everybody contributed immensely."
Yelawolf
Yelawolf
For as volatile as it sounds, the actual dictionary term for "radioactive" leaves a lot to the imagination. But just as he does with every word he spits, Ghet-O-Vision/Shady recording artist Yelawolf gives it new life and meaning. Making it a fitting title for his official debut album.

"I think its a perfect word to describe where I'm going," says the Alabama born rapper. "It's the fallout, the aftermath of everything I've been through and here's what's left. This radioactive material."

With a life story that no book could contain, the artist born Michael Atha could have auditioned for the "most interesting man in the world" title. Geograpically, he was born in a state that rests between Mississippi and Georgia but mentally he was raised in a state of constant change. Bouncing around between Alabama and Tennessee as a child, Wolf's upbringing exposed him to the impoverished realities of both White America's trailer parks and Black America's ghettos.

The duality would finally define itself on a fateful evening where his mother was playing host to a group of friends who happened to be the roadie crew for rapstars Run DMC. It was that night where Wolf, who was raised on a healthy dosage of Southern Rock, would hear songs like "My Adidas" and Beastie Boys "Paul Revere" for the first time. From that point on he knew that Hip Hop was now in his DNA. Unfortunately up to this point Wolf had to battle Hip Hop listeners who judged by outside appearance...but he's winning that fight now.

After years of toiling in the rap chitlin circuit, the mixtape matrix and doing hooks for a spectrum of artists ranging from Juelz Santana to Slim Thug, Wolf broke out in grand fashion with his critically acclaimed independent release Trunk Muzik (Ghet-O-Vision Ent.) on New Year's Day 2010. Prideful boasts on songs like "I Wish" ("I wish a motherfucker would tell me that I ain't Hip Hop/Bitch! You ain't Hip Hop!) made listeners look beyond his tattoo-decorated skin and respect his skills. The excitement, paired with his unforgettable live shows, led to numerous magazine covers a record deal through Ghet-O-Vision/Interscope and then a partnership with Shady Records. The label founded by the man who many naysayers opted to unfavorably compare him to, Eminem.

"There is a fair comparison between us," says Wolf. "But the true difference is vocal. The cadence and the words I use. There are words that I can rhyme that he can't just because of my Southern accent. I can go to totally different places because of my slang alone."

He wastes no time taking you to these places on Radioactive. With an additional meaning of aspiring to be "active on the radio" the album's first single "Hard White" featuring club music kingpin Lil Jon is a dark, 808-fueled uppercut that shows traces of the 3-6 Mafia influence he picked up while living in Tennessee. Wolf takes it even further on "Throw It Up" featuring former Mafia member Gangsta Boo and Eminem, pulling from both sides of the tracks he was raised on.

"Juxtaposition is very comforting for me," he says. "You can't stare at a square, that's boring. But if it's broken, you stare at it longer and try to figure it out. This song is culturally impactful."

With skateboarding being his first love before his affair with Hip Hop, Yelawolf already traveled the country living everywhere between California and New York, crashing on couches and park benches. So when he writes national anthems like "Made In the USA" that pairs lyrics about the dirt with a flowery hook, know that it comes from the perspective of a fly that has been in the dumps, not just on the wall.

"The grit and gutters are what I know the most about," says Wolf who also had a stint as an artic fisherman in Alaska. "I always believed that the people who build the cars, clean the houses, dig the ditches and sell the drugs are the ones who make the world go round. As pretty as the hook is, it's still sarcastic. The melody is great, but I was able to hide a real vocal point behind it."

He continues to drive these points home on the tracks "Growing Up In the Gutter" featuring his Slumerican partner in rhyme Rittz and the instant smash "Let's Roll" featuring fellow American badass Kid Rock. Both of which showcase his unique ability to shift gears from Southern Hip Hop to Southern Rock all the while remaining neutral in his own lane.

""I'm one of the most honest artists out there and I've always been this way," says Wolf in mentioning his crotch-kicking manifesto "No Hands" where he shoots at naysayers and imitators. "It doesn't matter what music I make whether I'm rapping on an 808 or over a guitar. I have a birth right to talk about these things that I do."

Radioactive is also Yelawolf's opportunity to open up and share some of the non-musical experiences that have made him the man and artist he is today.

On "I See You," a song inspired by a talk with his grandmother, he talks about hitting rock bottom before finally realizing that you had the best in life all along. With "The Hardest Love Song In the World" he stays true to the title admitting that it's two parts difficult writing a "rap ballad," especially about the special type of woman he likes. Then in the appropriately named "The Last Song" he talks about his rocky relationship with his estranged biological father, for the final time.

"I'm not mad at him and I don't have a grudge," he says. "But I just had to get that off, musically."

Though he's been releasing material since the early 2000's, Radioactive qualifies as Yelawolf's official "debut." Unlike his prior efforts that were recorded in basements and garages, only to be appreciated by his first core of loyal fans, this album was captured amidst rigorous touring, growing anticipation and now, expectation. If his ability to survive the last ten years are any indication, Wolf will rise to the occasion and beyond.

"I see this album as my Southernplayalistic and I hope it does what "Hey Ya!" or "B.o.B" did for Outkast," says the artist who was featured on Big Boi's 2010 single "You Ain't No DJ" that was produced by Andre 3000. "The goal of making albums is seeing where else you can go. I made sure everything I made was at the core, true to what i was."
Islander
It has been quite a journey for ISLANDER, who, in just over a year, have gone from obscurity to a band in constant radio rotation. Fueled with a combination of emotionally capturing songs and audience grabbing live shows, ISLANDER continue to lead at the forefront of their peers.

The thrilling trip for this quartet began in the foothills of Greenville, S.C. with the release of their Victory Records debut Pains. in 2013. Now, a lethal combination of alt-rock, punk and nu-metal that recalls the finest of bands like Refused and Deftones, ISLANDER have released their full length Violence & Destruction to critical recognition. Comprised of members Mikey Carvajal on vocals, Andrew Murphy on guitar, drummer Eric Frazier and bassist Chris Doot, ISLANDER recorded the album with producer Cameron Webb (SILVERSTEIN, ALKALINE TRIO) at Hollywood's NRG Studios. It is twelve tracks of American rock anthems spawned by individual struggle and organic affection. The result is a refreshing and unpredictable performance of cutting edge, modern-day rock with classic punk overtones fused with groove laden beats.

Violence & Destruction awakens the nerves and lets life in. From the blockbuster single 'Coconut Dracula', to the outlaw collaboration of 'Criminals' with P.O.D.'s Sonny Sandoval and the fist-pumping title track, ISLANDER sonically 'demonstrate that fragile dichotomy between softness and weight in a riff', as described by Noisey/Vice.

Already this year, ISLANDER have been part of the Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival and their full length release Violence & Destruction was deemed one of Revolver's 'Most Anticipated Of 2014'. The proof is evident in the response.

Alternative Press confirmed that ISLANDER was one the '100 Bands You Need To Know' as 2014 continues to shine with festival confirmations at Aftershock in Sacramento and Louder Than Life in Louisville.

The band made the most of the Mayhem Tour, not only by generating tens of thousands of fans across the festival tour's routing, but also with other bands on the bill - most notably KoRn, who's members were found to be onstage watching ISLANDER's incendiary performances each day. Is this an indication of a collaboration to come? Time will tell. In the meantime, several of the very bands that inspired them, are professing their affection for ISLANDER, including KoRn, Papa Roach, and P.O.D.
Venue Information:
Ford Idaho Center - Amphitheater
16200 Idaho Center Blvd.
Nampa, ID, 83687
http://www.fordidahocenter.com/